Carbon tax profile for Utah (Michael Deer; previous version byKaren Yang; mix of 2007 and 2005)

Utah
1990
2007
% change 1990-2005
Fossil fuel CO2 emissions, in millions of metric tonnes[1]
53.8
69.2
+29%
Fossil fuel CO2 emissions, in millions of short tons[2]
59.3
72.9
+23%
Population, in millions[3]
1.7
2.6
+53%
Per capita CO2 emissions, in short tons
34.5
29.2
-15.4%


Per capita emissions in Utah in 2007 were higher than the U.S. average, which was 21.4 short tons per capita.[4] One factor is that more than 80% of Utah households use natural gas for home heating.[5] Despite this, Utah ranks 14th highest in the nation in per capita carbon footprint. The discrepancy may be attributable to the types of energy the state consumes, noted Utah Foundation researchers. For example, coal-fired plants generate roughly 90 percent of Utah's electricity, compared with a national average of 49 percent.[6]

A carbon tax of $30 per short ton of CO2 (about $0.30 per gallon of gasoline, or about $0.03 per kWh of coal-fired power) would have raised about $1.7 billion in 2005 (about $700 per person), assuming a 20% reduction in emissions.

For comparison purposes, in 2005 the state sales tax generated about $1.6 billion.[7] A carbon tax of $30 per short ton of CO2 could (assuming a 20% reduction in emissions) have replaced 100% of all state sales taxes with $100 million left over. Also, in 2005 the individual income tax generated about $1.9 billion. A carbon tax of $30 per short ton of CO2 could (assuming a 20% reduction in emissions) have replaced almost 100% of all individual income taxes.

Carbon offsets
  1. ^ From EPA, “State CO2 Emissions from fossil fuel combustion, 1990-2007”, linked from here.
  2. ^ 1 metric tonne equals 1.1023 short tons.
  3. ^ 2007 population from the U.S. Census Bureau, http://www.census.gov/popest/states/NST-ann-est.html. 1990 population from U.S. Census Bureau, http://www.census.gov/popest/archives/1990s/ST-99-02.txt
    .
  4. ^ U.S. population of 301.6 million in 2007 from U.S. Census Bureau, http://www.census.gov/popest/states/NST-ann-est.html. U.S. carbon emissions of 5.757 billion tonnes (or 6.346 billion short tons) of CO2 from EPA's 2010 U.S. Greenhouse Gas Inventory Report.
  5. ^ Utah state profiles from the EIA, http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/state/state_energy_profiles.cfm?sid=UT.
  6. ^ Article: "Utah's Coal Consumption impacts Carbon Footprint" http://www.sunad.com/index.php?article_id=15468&tier=1
  7. ^ 2005 Utah State Tax Commission figure, http://tax.utah.gov/esu/revenue/tc23_2006.pdf.