Carbon tax profile for Ohio (Evan Young)


1990
2007
% change 1990-2007
Fossil fuel CO2 emissions, in millions of metric tonnes[1]
246.5
267.7
+8.6%
Fossil fuel CO2 emissions, in millions of short tons[2]
271.7
295.1
+8.6%
Population, in millions[3]
10.8
11.5
+6.5%
Per capita CO2 emissions, in short tons
25.2
25.7
+2%

Per capita emissions for Ohio in 2007 were slightly above the U.S. average of 21.0 short tons per capita.[4] The reasons mostly revolve around the amount of large emitting industry still found in Ohio and the lack of renewable power. [5]

Considering the size of the industrial sector and the availability of coal a potentially more interesting question is why Ohio's emissions are not higher. The answer seems to be two converging trends: the relative decline of industry as a significant piece of Ohio's economy and fuel switching from heavily emitting coal to relatively lower emitting natural gas (see figure below). [6]

Ohio_emissions.jpg

A carbon tax of $30 per short ton of CO2 (about $0.30 per gallon of gasoline, or about $0.03 per kWh of coal-fired power) would have raised about $8 billion in 2007 (about $695 per person), assuming a 10% reduction in emissions.

For reference, in 2007 (FY08) Ohio generated $9bn from income tax and $7bn from sales tax as part of a $21bn revenue stream.[7] With the revenue from a carbon tax Ohio could have eliminated their entire sales tax.

carbon emissions
  1. ^ From EPA, “State CO2 Emissions from fossil fuel combustion, 1990-2007”, linked from here.
  2. ^ 1 metric tonne equals 1.1023 short tons.
  3. ^ 2007 population from the U.S. Census Bureau, http://www.census.gov/popest/states/NST-ann-est.html. 1990 population from U.S. Census Bureau, http://www.census.gov/popest/archives/1990s/ST-99-02.txt.
  4. ^ U.S. population of 301.6 million in 2007 from U.S. Census Bureau, http://www.census.gov/popest/states/NST-ann-est.html. U.S. carbon emissions of 5.757 billion tonnes (or 6.346 billion short tons) of CO2 from EPA's 2010 U.S. Greenhouse Gas Inventory Report.
  5. ^ World Resources Institute. Charting the Midwest: Ohio p. 3
  6. ^ Ibid p. 5
  7. ^ Ohio General Revenue Fund Sources p. 2