Carbon tax profile for Illinois (Chi Ho [Kaifer] Young; previous version by

Matthew Klein)


Illinois
1990
2007
% change 1990-2007
Fossil fuel CO2 emissions in millions of metric tons[1]
194
242.8
+25.2%
In millions of short tons[2]
214
267.9
+25.2%
Population in millions[3]
11.4
12.8
+12.1%
Per capita CO2 emissions in short tons
18.8
21.0
+11.5%

Per capita emissions in Illinois State in 2007 were considerably equal with the U.S. average, which is 21.45 short tons per capita.[4] This was probably because Illinois is a crude oil production state and it receives oil from Canada and Gulf Coast; later transport crude oil throughout North America. Also Illinois used to rank at the top oil-producing states, but these days Illinois has gone down to the middle of the rank. Furthermore, the growth of population increases electricity uses and increase carbon emissions. But government is enforcing statewide renewable energy standard policy and asks utilities to use at least 25% of their total power from renewable sources by 2025. Therefore, that can be the reason why there was not a huge increase or decrease from 2005-2007.[5]

A carbon tax of $30 per short ton of CO2 (about $0.30 per gallon of gasoline, or about $0.03 per kWh of coal-fired power) would have raised about $7.23 billion in 2007 (about $565.92 per person), assuming a 10% reduction in emissions.

For comparison purposes, in 2007 the state corporate income tax($243 per capita) generated about $3.1 billion, the state individual income tax($738 per capita) generated about $9.4 billion, and the state sales tax($1456 per capita) generated about $18.6 billion. So a carbon tax of $30 per short ton of CO2 (about $0.30 per gallon of gasoline, or about $0.03 per kWh of coal-fired power) raised about $7.23 billion in 2007 (about $565.92 per person), assuming a 10% reduction in emissions, could have replaced state corportate income tax or replaced 76.6% of the state individual income tax or could have replaced 38.7 of the state sales tax.[6]
  1. ^ EPA, “State CO2 Emissions from fossil fuel combustion, 1990-2007”, linked from http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/state_energyco2inv.html.
  2. ^ Weight Measure Conversion http://www.easysurf.cc/cnver3.htm#mtts2
  3. ^ 2007 population from the U.S. Census Bureau,http://www.census.gov/popest/states/NST-ann-est.html 1990 population from U.S. Census Bureau, http://www.census.gov/popest/archives/1990s/ST-99-02.txt.
  4. ^ http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/downloads/CO2FFC_2005.pdf
  5. ^ [[http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/state/state_energy_profiles.cfm?sid=IL Illinois energy profile from the EIA]]
  6. ^ [[http://www.taxfoundation.org/research/topic/26.html The Facts on Illinois’ Tax Climate]]